I want a man who reads.

Quite the simple request, a man who is literate. A man who can spell. A man who thinks “Brave New World” is far more well written than “1984” simply for all the Shakespeare in it.

A man who can appreciate Dostoevsky, Doyle and Woolf. In alphabetical order.

A man who adores Murakami’s magic, admires Wilde’s wit and understands Kundera’s love.

Having written this down, I’m starting to think that I’m asking for too much. I’m better off studying and watching a Bogie/Bacall movie, which is exactly what I’m going to do now.


Gender Gap Vanishes in Female-Empowered Cultures

One of the issues that has prevented the full participation of females in math and the sciences is the persistent belief that males have innate math skills that are superior to those of females. Even as studies show that the math gap disappears in countries with greater gender equality, it seems to persist in higher education, which allows it to be transmitted to new generations.
But, even as basic math skills have evened out in many countries, differences in spatial reasoning abilities have not followed as quickly, even in places like Sweden and Norway, where math skills are now equal. This raises the prospect that there is some biological difference between the sexes — it just isn’t basic math. A new study in PNAS, however, suggests that spatial reasoning differences may also be the product of society.
The study takes advantage of a convenient natural experiment. There are two tribes in Northeast India that are very similar in many ways. They both share the same agrarian lifestyle and diet, reside in close proximity, and DNA tests indicate that they are closely related. The biggest difference between them is culture. Among other differences, the Karbi are patrilineal; women do not typically own land, and the oldest son inherits the family’s property after the death of the parents. The Khasi could not be more different in this regard. Men are not allowed to own land at all, any money or goods earned by a male are handed over to his wife or sister, and inheritances go to the youngest daughter in the family.
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Gender Gap Vanishes in Female-Empowered Cultures

One of the issues that has prevented the full participation of females in math and the sciences is the persistent belief that males have innate math skills that are superior to those of females. Even as studies show that the math gap disappears in countries with greater gender equality, it seems to persist in higher education, which allows it to be transmitted to new generations.

But, even as basic math skills have evened out in many countries, differences in spatial reasoning abilities have not followed as quickly, even in places like Sweden and Norway, where math skills are now equal. This raises the prospect that there is some biological difference between the sexes — it just isn’t basic math. A new study in PNAS, however, suggests that spatial reasoning differences may also be the product of society.

The study takes advantage of a convenient natural experiment. There are two tribes in Northeast India that are very similar in many ways. They both share the same agrarian lifestyle and diet, reside in close proximity, and DNA tests indicate that they are closely related. The biggest difference between them is culture. Among other differences, the Karbi are patrilineal; women do not typically own land, and the oldest son inherits the family’s property after the death of the parents. The Khasi could not be more different in this regard. Men are not allowed to own land at all, any money or goods earned by a male are handed over to his wife or sister, and inheritances go to the youngest daughter in the family.

Read More

(via saudihominid-deactivated2012052)